Abstracts

European Coatings WebForum |
Preservation

 

Short course: A contradiction - environmentally preferable but clean coatings?

Dr Anders Larsson, RISE Institute, Sweden

In the years ahead the European Union is planning tough legislation for the use of biocides in paints. The reason is the debate about allergens in waterborne paints. The risk is of course that using biocide concentrations below the minimum inhibition concentration for resistance towards microbial growth in the paint can and in the paint film will lead to increased growth of these organisms. At RISE Research Institutes of Sweden we are conducting research to inhibit microbial growth by making the living conditions less pleasant for the microbes. We can identify three key areas to follow in this case: 1. The production of waterborne paints until the paints are stored in a closed can; 2. The use of an opened can and storage of that; 3. The paint film after application. We will in this presentation discuss how we handle this challenge for each identified key area.

 

Keynote: Keynote: Joint efforts to manage the challenges of BPR for plant hygiene and product preservation

Monika Lamoretta, Lanxess and Alexander Böhler, Remmers, Germany

Protecting manufacturing facilities and products from microbial contamination, while complying with EU BPR 528/2012 poses significant challenges for the entire industry. Remmers and Lanxess explain how these challenges can be addressed by a close cooperation between manufacturers and suppliers to the paints and coatings industry. A holistic approach must be comprised of rapid analytical methods, highest levels of hygiene across the entire supply chain as well as a measaured and targeted use of biocides. 

 

Versatile and Reliable: The Role of Sodium Pyrithione in In-can Preservation

Johannes Köhler, Lonza, Switzerland

Water-borne formulations require a robust preservation. Preservative solutions are mostly based on a blend of active substances. Due to its complementary mode of action, Sodium Pyrithione is a natural fit as a co-biocide mostly for iso-thiazolinones. Due to the dynamic regulatory environment, the number of available substances is likely to decrease in the future. This will give Sodium Pyrithione an even more prominent place in the spotlight. What can and cannot be expected from Sodium Pyrithione?

 

Undesired green – Microbiological Growth on facades

Dr Christoph Walter, German Paint and Printing Ink Association (VdL), Germany

To deliver on the goals of the Green Deal within the framework of the circular economy and a sustainable product policy, it is important that the service live of façade paints should be as long as possible. This encompasses that the façade retains its desired appearance. However, microbial infestation by fungi and algea can be interfering with this goal. Apart from constructive measures, one possible remedy is the use of dry-film preservatives.  However, in the course of the systematic re-evaluation of all biocidal active substances it is expected that the number of useable actives for PT7 will dramatically reduce, which leads to ecological and economic consequences. In this talk the reasons for microbiological growth and different possibilities of preventing it will be discussed, with a focus on the regulatory situation of the dry-film preservatives.

 

Dispersible Polymer Powders Based on VAE for Biocide-Free Wall Paints

Dr Stefan Baueregger, Wacker, Germany 

Modern wall paint formulations are mostly based on liquid organic binders. Water-based formulations have many obvious disadvantages. For instance, water creates a favorable environment for bacteria, microbes or fungi to develop and propagate. That’s why wall paints often contain biocides, which increase in-can stability, but face growing regulatory pressure. In addition, consumer awareness around sustainable and low-emission end products is on the rise. The new VAE dispersible polymer powder (DPP) product line from WACKER offers a new alternative: organic polymer binders in dry form for powder-based wall paints. These biocide-free paints can simply be mixed with water as needed just before use. Small quantities for renovations can be stirred by hand in a few minutes, while larger amounts can be prepared just as quickly with a paint mixer. The new VAE DPPs have a broad formulation range and enable individual adjustment of quality levels and color shades. With its new VAE DPPs, WACKER is making its mark in terms of sustainability and contributing toward avoiding the wastage reported by the German Paint and Printing Inks Industry Association - 11 million buckets of wall paint annually.

 

Preservatives in the crosshairs of regulation - What does this mean in practice?

Dr. Gabriele Büttner, Umco, Germany

Reductions of waste levels or increases in product lifetime for paints and coating products are impossible to imagine without the use of in-can preservatives and film protection agents. Whether a DIY hobbyist, commercial, or industrial user - nobody wants microbial growth in their paint can. On the flip side, biocidal active ingredients in this area often have questionable properties, with classifications as allergens or as harmful to the environment. This has led to the EU establishing strict legislation for the use of in-can and dry-film preservatives. This presentation will give an overview of the status of the active substance evaluations, followed by an analysis of what the restrictions mean for the use of preservatives in paints and varnishes and what limitations can be imposed on labels, including the consequences for end-users.

 

Preservative free products - the right strategy to sustainability or a dead end?

Ingo Krull, Vink Chemicals, Germany

The trend in chemical industry in green and sustainable products unbroken and will drive our business within in the next 5-10 years. In this context preservatives (biocides) are very often considered as a necessary evil and it is very attractive for formulators of chemical consumer products to eliminate them…..but is that really the right direction? The intention of this presentation is to discuss this issue with the focus on consumer safety. The Key elements of the talk are: - Consumer expectation (green and sustainable) -One practical example: The current situation in the cosmetic industry and product liability - Target of the European Biocidal Products Regulation and why we can’t expect new “green” actives within the next 5 years - New sustainable preservation concepts and strategies

 

Preventing microbial contamination in products and processes using a CellFacts rapid microbial detection system

Alexander Böhler, Cellfacts Analytics, Germany

Reductions of waste levels or increases in product lifetime for paints and coating products are impossible to imagine without the use of in-can preservatives and film protection agents. Whether a DIY hobbyist, commercial, or industrial user - nobody wants microbial growth in their paint can. On the flip side, biocidal active ingredients in this area often have questionable properties, with classifications as allergens or as harmful to the environment. This has led to the EU establishing strict legislation for the use of in-can and dry-film preservatives. This presentation will give an overview of the status of the active substance evaluations, followed by an analysis of what the restrictions mean for the use of preservatives in paints and varnishes and what limitations can be imposed on labels, including the consequences for end-users.

 

Influence of pigments on phototransformation of biocides in paints

Dr Ulla Bollmann, Aarhus University, Denmark

Biocides are commonly applied to construction materials such as facade renders and paints in order to protect them from microbial spoilage. These renders and paints are exposed to weathering conditions, e.g., sunlight and rain. Thus, biocides might be affected by sunlight already on the material´s surface. Often, biocides do not interact directly with the sunlight, but other components of the materials do and then transfer the energy to the biocides, which then might transform (so-called indirect phototransformation). Pigments are interacting intensively with the spectrum of the incoming light; thus, an effect of paint pigments on phototransformation rates and reaction pathways of the biocides was hypothesized. Accordingly, we investigated the phototransformation of four commonly used biocides (carbendazim, diuron, octylisothiazolinone (OIT) and terbutryn) in four different paint formulations differing solely in pigments (red and black iron oxides, white titanium dioxide, and one pigment-free formulation). Paints surfaces were irradiated under controlled conditions. The results show that biocides degrade most rapidly in the pigment-free formulation. The degradation was considerably slower in the pigment-containing paints. The determination of several phototransformation products of terbutryn and octylisothiazolinone showed that different transformation products where formed dependent on the pigment. In conclusion, pigments reflect the incoming light and thus protect biocides from phototransformation, but additionally, they interact with the phototransformation of biocides.

 

Is underwater cleaning on non-toxic coatings permissible in German sea ports?

Dr Burkhard Watermann, Limnomar, Germany

The challenge of maritime transport is keeping the role as the most energy-efficient and environmental friendly transportation system. Nevertheless, IMO calls for a reduction in gaseous emissions and release of harmful substances into the sea, as well as avoidance of fouling organisms. Thus, Biofouling Management is on top of the agenda. Embedded in a Biofouling Management Plan, cleaning can play a key role. Proactive fouling prevention by cleaning can be addressed under various  headings like ‘Clean before you leave’  or ‘Clean before arrival’,  or ‘proactive grooming’ are in practice on biocidal antifouling paints but getting popular in combination with non-biocidal, coatings with high abrasion resistance which withstand the impact of multiple cleaning actions. As cleaning on biocidal antifouling paints is banned in German ports, the project ‘CLEAN’ was started with stakeholders from shipping companies, port authorities and diving companies to explore techniques and requirements for cleaning permits on non-toxic under water coatings. Cleaning techniques with capture of removed fouling and filtrations systems were demonstrated on a couple of vessels heading the port of Bremerhaven and Helsinki bearing ice breaker coatings (‘Polarstern’, AWI), abrasion resistant coatings (‘WEGA’, BSH), and ferry ‘Gabriella’ (Viking)  with anticorrosive coating. It could be shown that the cleaning technique used by DG Diving proofed to be efficient and environmental friendly due to the efficacy of the capture and filtration system. The actual work load consists of the development of an application scheme containing requirements for each vessel (Biofouling Management Plan, non-biocidal hard coatings, data on operation profile) and the description of the cleaning technique (capture system, filtration, experience and permits in the past). Drafts of application schemes developed for the ports of Bremen have been discussed and will be discussed and coordinated among German sea port authorities to offer a kind of unique template for future permits.

 

Biocide-free architectural coatings: How to use the right additives to formulate silicate-based systems with dispersion paint properties

Dr Sebastian Prock, Clariant, Germany

Increasing regulatory pressure and more stringent ecolabel requirements towards in-can and dry-film preservation of architectural coatings represents a big challenge for European and global paint formulators. Together with a growing consumer awareness for a healthier living environment, architectural coatings containing biocides must evolve in order to stay within these boundary conditions. Keeping with the times, the European paint industry has already made some tremendous steps to face this market demand. Examples are additivated dispersion paint formulations to reduce overall biocide content, together with a more stringent focus on production hygiene, finally resulting in a lower microbial load and improved shelf-life. Also, more disruptive approaches are discussed and have already been developed such as powder-based or water-free technologies. Apart from these concepts and very often neglected in the discussion about how to adapt to the market demand for biocide-free paints are silicate and organo-silicate architectural paint systems. These technologies are by definition - and due to their unique chemical profile - free of biocides. One of the reasons though, why these paint technologies have not yet made it to fully compete with biocide containing dispersion paints, especially for indoor applications, are their physical parameters and the resulting poorer handling properties for applicators. During this presentation we discuss our findings on how the right additives for silicate paint systems will help to achieve dispersion paint performance and handling, and therefore represent a biocide-free alternative to current technologies.

 

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Sven Gerullis, Innovent, Germany

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Booster Technology  in the in-can preservation: Beyond the ecologic label.

tbc, ChemiPol, Spain

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On-demand talk: Realtime and quantitative microbial control

Jasper Stegeman, Aquatools, The Netherlands

Keeping a product biocide-free is one thing but keeping your product and production free from microbial-contamination is another story. Luminultra is a unique microbial control technique that provides quantitative- and instant- insight in the microbial content in every sample and every spot in the production. From the incoming products, production and all the way to the end-product, this technology helps preventing pro-actively against disturbances or contaminations. Traditional tests take days and solutions can take weeks. Valuable time that you can save with a new way of testing. Also, typically traditional tests can over- or under- estimate the contamination. During the presentation you will be provided with insight in the theoretical background of this technology. Also, we will highlight why performing real-time microbial control is essential to keep your (future) products clean and biocide- free.

 

On-demand talk: Hygiene in production technology

Pascal Volkmer, R+B Technik, Germany

This presentation is about hygiene in production process plants by having an eye on production equipment and processes. We will talk about future production concepts, hygienic pigging technology, effective cleaning processes and how to handle water-borne dispersions without conservation

 

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