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3. Jul 2018 | Raw materials

New technique for high-quality surfactant manufacturing

The Centre for Process Innovation (CPI) announced that, as part of a larger consortium, it has developed a new process for the manufacturing of surfactants.

The new technology can be used in other valuable chemistries, such as polymer intermediates, organic additives and nanoparticles. Source: geralt / Pixabay.

The new technique reduces infrastructure costs and improves efficiency, without impacting on quality. The success of this novel method, which was developed in collaboration with speciality chemical manufacturer Croda International Plc, technology designers NiTech Solutions and The University of Cambridge’s Institute for Manufacturing, established the technical viability and potential for full scale commercial adoption. The project was part funded by Innovate UK.

Surfactants are compounds that are widely used in consumer and industrial products which make it possible for liquids, solids and gases that don’t readily dissolve to become soluble in water. Due to this property, they are extensively used in the detergent industry to remove dirt and stains. Traditionally, the industrial production of these materials often occurred in large batch reactors, which had low energy efficiency and a long reaction time. Recently, researchers at CPI, Croda and NiTech, have addressed this problem by developing a new process for surfactant manufacture.

Possible use across multiple chemical sectors

This new process uses NiTech’s patented continuous oscillating baffle reactor (COBR) technology, a flow reactor that provides a high level of mixing with high accuracy. Following industrial scale testing at one of Croda’s manufacturing sites in the UK, the COBR technology-based process has been shown to be considerably more compact than established batch processes, without compromising product quality. Working alongside the industrial scale tests, researchers from the University of Cambridge’s Institute for Manufacturing examined the changes that may be required to business models to ensure radical changes in technology are implemented successfully within a business.

The flexibility of the unit means it can be easily modified and complemented with other technologies, widening its use to a range of other valuable chemistries, such as polymer intermediates, organic additives and nanoparticles. More efficient production of polymer intermediates, for example, could benefit the manufacture of shampoos for the personal care industry. This breadth in capability will allow the use of the new technique across multiple chemical sectors, a feature that will help boost UK chemical innovation.

For more information visit the website of CPI.

Image source: Pixabay

EC Library The Rheology Handbook

Books

The Rheology Handbook

Already in its 5th edition, this standard work describes the principles of rheology clearly, vividly and in practical terms. The book includes the rheology of additives in waterborne dispersions and surfactant systems. Not only it is a great reference book, it can also serve as a textbook for studying the theory behind the methods. The practical use of rheology is presented in the areas quality control, production and application, chemical and mechanical engineering, materials science and industrial research and development. After reading this book, the reader should be able to perform tests with rotational and oscillatory rheometers and interpret the results correctly.

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