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Saturday, 23 March 2019
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Raw materials & technologies, Science today - coatings tomorrow

Researchers want to accelerate the scanning probe micropscope

Friday, 9 April 2010

Since more than twenty years, scanning force microscopes are employed in research and industry. Their enormous resolution triggered many applications in nanotechnology.

A technology that will accelerate scanning probe microscopes by a factor of 1000 Source: Uwe Bellhäuser - das bilderwerk

A technology that will accelerate scanning probe microscopes by a factor of 1000 Source: Uwe Bellhäuser - das bilderwerk

Physicists of Saarland University in the team of Prof. Uwe Hartmann have developed a technology that could accelerate scanning probe microscopes by a factor of 1000. A scanning probe microscope works like a record player. There, a needle follows the record track, mapping the fine structure of the track. The microscope uses a much smaller silicon needle instead, and direct contact with the surface is avoided. Surface structures are mapped by atomic forces, usually van-der-Waals interactions. With the nanocantilever, as it is called, surfaces will be mapped a lot faster and with higher precision. State-of-the-art scanning probe microscopes operate at frequencies around 100 Kilohertz. Their rather low image rate is however a disadvantage - changing objects and processes cannot be imaged. With the new design, one hundred images per second and more and an increase in resolution will be possible. This is more than video rate.

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Please find here more information about the project

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