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Wednesday, 18 September 2019
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Raw materials & technologies

SIN List updated with new tool for sustainable substitution launched

Friday, 10 October 2014

A new tool identifies SIN-like chemicals and thereby avoids non-sustainable substitution.

A new tool identifies SIN-like chemicals and thereby avoids non-sustainable substitution. Source: FikMik/Fotolia

A new tool identifies SIN-like chemicals and thereby avoids non-sustainable substitution. Source: FikMik/Fotolia

Since 2008 the SIN List has been highlighting chemicals of high concern that are likely to be subject to future EU regulation, and as a result it has been recognised as an important driver for innovation. Today´s update lists an additional 28 chemicals for priority action and takes one step further by launching SINimilarity – a tool for identifying SIN-like chemicals and thereby avoiding non-sustainable substitution.
In recent decades a number of hazardous chemicals have been put under the spotlight and become a target for regulatory action and phase-out. This has often been successful, but in some cases the substitutes have later been shown to have similar hazardous properties as the problematic chemicals they replaced.

The update of the SIN List adds 28 substances to the list. Many of these are chemicals that have been used to replace better known hazardous substances, but are in fact just as problematic. For example, the hormone-disrupting chemicals Bisphenol F and Bisphenol S have now been included on the SIN List. These substances have been frequently used to replace one of the most commonly used chemicals globally, Bisphenol A. Modified versions of already regulated brominated flame retardants and fluorinated chemicals have also been added.

To give a better overview of the chemicals, the SIN List has now also been divided into 31 groups based on structure and toxic properties. Examples of these groups are bisphenols, phthalates and perfluorinated compounds.

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