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Tuesday, 17 September 2019
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Raw materials & technologies, Raw materials, Coatings pigments

How light-scattering particles could help to combat climate change

Monday, 14 May 2012

Geo-engineering concept advocates dispersing benign titanium dioxide particles as used in paint, inks and sunscreens into the stratosphere to deflect the sun’s rays.

Five tethered balloons would loft 1.5 million tonnes of titanium dioxide particles into the stratosphere each year. The balloon size is far larger than any launched to date to avoid ‘blow over’ from the fierce winds that the tether will experience 10 km above the earth. The cost of the technology is significantly cheaper than other proposed stratospheric particle injection systems such as aircraft, artillery, and even tall towers

Source: IChemE/A Revell
Five tethered balloons would loft 1.5 million tonnes of titanium dioxide particles into the stratosphere each year. The balloon size is far larger...

Dispersing fine (sub-micron) light-scattering particles into the upper atmosphere could help to combat climate change, suggests a former UK government advisor and chemical engineer. The technology concept developed in the UK, advocates dispersing benign titanium dioxide particles as used in paint, inks and sunscreens into the stratosphere to deflect the sun’s rays. Peter Davidson, a Chartered Chemical Engineer, Fellow of the Institution of Chemical Engineers (IChemE) and the Royal Academy of Engineering, and a former senior innovation advisor to a number of government departments, will call for this geo-engineering concept to be researched as an insurance policy to cope with possible catastrophic effects of global warming if we don’t manage to reduce CO2 emissions fast enough.

"While it’s essential that we work to reduce carbon dioxide emissions now, it would be wise to have a well-researched emergency system in reserve as a Plan B,” says Davidson.

http://www.icheme.org

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