Please wait.'

Page is loading'


Home  > Raw materials & technologies  > Applications  > Quantifying sea-water exposed mortar throu...

Wednesday, 17 July 2019
pdf
Raw materials & technologies, Applications

Quantifying sea-water exposed mortar through a simple permeability test

Monday, 25 April 2016

Concrete has an autogenous ability to heal cracks potentially contributing to its functional water tightness and durability.

Although concrete is the world’s most used building material, it has a serious flaw: It can easily crack when under tension. Source: Kurt Michel/pixelio.de
Although concrete is the world’s most used building material, it has a serious flaw: It can easily crack when under tension. Source: Kurt Michel/pi...

Here, researchers from Faculty of Civil Engineering & Geosciences, Section of Materials and Environment, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands, quantify the crack-healing capacity of sea-water submerged mortar specimens through a simple and rapid permeability test.

Healing potential depends on initial crack width

Defined crack width geometries were created in blast furnace slag cement specimens allowing healed specimens to be quantified against unhealed specimens. Specimens with 0.2 mm wide cracks were not permeable after 28 days submersion. Specimens with 0.4 mm cracks had decreases in permeability of 66% after 28 days submersion, and 50–53% after 56 days submersion. Precipitation of aragonite and brucite in the cracks was the main cause of crack healing. Healing potential was dependent on the initial crack width, thermodynamic considerations and the amount of ions available in the crack. To our knowledge, this is the first study to quantify the functional autogenous healing capacity of cracked sea-water exposed cementitious specimens.

The study is published in: Cement and Concrete Research, Volume 84, June 2016, Pages 1-7

top of page
Comments (0)
Add Comment

Post comment

You are not logged in

register