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Tuesday, 17 September 2019
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Raw materials & technologies, Applications, Protective & Marine coatings

U.S. Defense Department appreciates project on corrosion-protection

Thursday, 24 January 2013

Missouri University of Science and Technology researchers investigate corrosion-protection mechanisms for rare-earth-based corrosion coatings that could be used on military aircraft.

Missouri S&T researchers investigate environmentally benign, corrosion-resistant coatings for military aircraft

Source: Sasha Radosavljevic/ Fotolia
Missouri S&T researchers investigate environmentally benign, corrosion-resistant coatings for military aircraft Source: Sasha Radosavljevic/ F...

A Missouri University of Science and Technology effort to investigate environmentally benign, corrosion-resistant coatings for military aircraft and other weapons systems has received national recognition from the U.S. Defense Department. One of the coatings investigated in this project was a primer coating that contains a corrosion inhibitor based on praseodymium oxide. The corrosion inhibitor was developed at Missouri S&T.

The Missouri S&T project was selected as a 2012 Project of the Year for the Weapon Systems and Platforms program within the Defense Department's Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP). SERDP selected the Missouri S&T project as one of four projects.

Rare-earth compounds to replace harmful substances

Led by Dr Bill Fahrenholtz, a senior investigator in Missouri S&T's Materials Research Center (MRC), and Dr Matt O'Keefe, Director of the MRC, the Missouri S&T researchers worked with Dr Eric Morris and Rich Albers, researchers with Deft Inc. of Irvine, CA, to understand the corrosion-protection mechanisms for rare-earth-based corrosion coatings for use on military aircraft. These rare-earth compounds are believed to be less harmful to the environment than conventional coating materials.

Most coating systems used for military aircraft contain hexavalent chromium, a toxic and carcinogenic substance. In 2009, the Pentagon adopted a policy to eliminate the use of compounds containing hexavalent chromium.

The Missouri S&T and Deft team "have made fundamental discoveries in understanding how rare-earth compounds containing cerium or praseodymium inhibit corrosion,” said SERDP.

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