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Home  > Raw materials & technologies  > Applications  > Protective & Marine coatings  > Mixing biocides tunes the paint

Monday, 23 September 2019
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Raw materials & technologies, Applications, Protective & Marine coatings

Mixing biocides tunes the paint

Wednesday, 20 June 2012

The current standard way of using protective biocides is insufficient as the biocide leaks out from the coating too fast – a new paint prevents this.

Anti-growth protection can be achieved by the use of encapsulated biocides Source: Fotolia/Paul Hampton

Anti-growth protection can be achieved by the use of encapsulated biocides Source: Fotolia/Paul Hampton

Presented at the European Coatings Conference "Marine coatings” by Lars Nordstierna of Chalmers University in Sweden as a promising improvement of anti-growth protection the antifouling paint is now ready.

Encapsulation decelerates the biocide distribution

This anti-growth protection can be achieved by the use of encapsulated biocides in the paint. The biocide is placed into micrometer-sized reservoirs from where it is slowly distributed into the coating. This method allows for a controlled prolongation of the coating protection as well as for optimisation of biocide combinations and concentrations.

Several biocides against a large number of fouling organisms

The growth of microorganisms, on coatings in general and on ship hulls in particular, has increased during the last decades as many anti-growth agents have gradually being prohibited due to toxicity.

The focus in this research project called Marine Paint, has been on a substance called medetomidine, which has proved highly effective against barnacles, considered to be the most problematic fouling organism.

To tackle other types of fouling as well (such as algae, mussels, sea squirts and moss animals), the researchers have developed a concept for producing optimised combinations of different antifouling agents, or biocides.

"The microcapsulation is a great idea to get a more regulated spread of biocides. And the solution to tune the paint by mixing the biocides leads to a huge coverage against fouling organisms.” Says Hans-Björne Elwing form University of Gothenburg in Sweden.

Field trials of painted test panels at the Sven Lovén Centre for Marine Sciences in Kristineberg have shown that the concept of optimised antifouling blends in bottom paints works very well.

Be as environmental-friendly as possible

"To keep the environmental impact at a minimum is the key issue of the development of new marine coatings” stated Lars Nordstierna in our gallery.

In a joint project, researchers at the University of Gothenburg and Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, finished the project for a new environmentally-friendly and effective bottom paint after nine years.
Marine Paint’s research results for medetomidine have been passed to the commercial partner I-Tech AB to ensure that they are put into practice, and the product is now being marketed under the name "Selektope”.

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