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Wednesday, 30 September 2020
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Raw materials & technologies, Applications, Protective & Marine coatings

Effects on cathodic delamination investigated

Thursday, 3 June 2010

Cathodic delamination is one of the major modes of failure for organic coatings immersed in seawater and refers to the weakening or loss of adhesion between the coating and the substrate. In a newwork, the effects of various parameters on this failure mode have been investigated.

Cathodic delamination is one of the major modes of failure for organic coatings immersed in seawater Source: Sven Rohweder/Pixelio

Cathodic delamination is one of the major modes of failure for organic coatings immersed in seawater Source: Sven Rohweder/Pixelio

Cathodic delamination is one of the major modes of failure for organic coatings immersed in seawater and refers to the weakening or loss of adhesion between the coating and the substrate. The diminished adhesion is the result of electrochemical reactions occurring at the coating-steel interface, where solid iron is oxidised to ferrous ions and oxygen is reduced to hydroxyl ions. In a new work, the effects of various parameters on cathodic delamination have been investigated. The results show that cathodic delamination increases with increasing concentration of cations up to the point where the concentration of dissolved oxygen becomes insufficient to maintain the corrosion rate. Increasing the pigment loading or partial replacement of spherical pigments with flake-shaped micaceous iron oxide or aluminium pigments reduces the rate of cathodic delamination. Read the complete paper in "Progress in Organic Coatings", Vol. 68, issue 4.

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