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Thursday, 19 September 2019
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Raw materials & technologies, Applications, Protective & Marine coatings

Diisocyanates influence the properties of marine coatings

Wednesday, 29 January 2014

Three researchers examined the effect of different types of diisocyanates and tetrafluorobutanediol for their use in waterborne polyurethane-fluorinated marine coatings.

Better mechanical and adhesive strength with TFBD Source: Henkel

Better mechanical and adhesive strength with TFBD Source: Henkel

The study was carried out by scientists from the Center of Research Excellence in Corrosion, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Saudi Arabia, and the Global Core Research Center for Ships and Offshore Plants, Pusan National University, Republic of Korea.

TFBD was used as a chain extender

First, they prepared three series of waterborne polyurethane-fluorinated coatings (WBPU) with single aliphatic (4,4′-dicyclohexylmethane diisocyanate, H12MDI), aromatic (4,4′-diphenylmethane, MDI) and a mixture of aliphatic and aromatic diisocyanates (1:1). Different contents of 2,2,3,3-tetrafluoro1,4-butanediol (TFBD) as a chain extender were used in the WBPU coatings. The fluoro-enriched surface of the WBPU coatings was obtained with a combination of a high TFBD content (8.77mol%) as well as the aliphatic or mixed diisocyanates. The tensile strength, Young's modulus, elongation at break (%) and adhesive strength were characterized with respect to the TFBD contents.

Adhesive strength increased with increasing TFBD

The mechanical strength and adhesive strength increased with increasing TFBD content in the three series. In artificial salt water, the maximum adhesive strength of WBPU was observed for this coating, which was achieved by TFBD bonded H12MDI of mixed diisocyanates with a higher TFBD content (8.77mol%).

The study is published in: Journal of Applied Polymer Science, Volume 131, Issue 4, February 15, 2014.

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