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Wednesday, 15 July 2020
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Markets & companies, Raw materials market

Photocatalytic technology for tunnels: Design case study and cost benefit analysis in the Maastunnel Rotterdam

Tuesday, 6 March 2012

Dr. Christoph Maria Ravesloot, Professor Innovation Sustainable Design and Construction Process at Rotterdam University of Applied Science published an article in European Coatings Journal 3/2012 (p. 8-10), which shows that the benefits of renovating the tunnel tubes in Rotterdam with photo catalytic technology are positive compared to the costs of the renovation.

Photocatalytic coatings in the Maastunnel can help remove part of the NOx and PM2.5 pollution from cars. Source: Rainer Sturm/Pixelio.de

Photocatalytic coatings in the Maastunnel can help remove part of the NOx and PM2.5 pollution from cars. Source: Rainer Sturm/Pixelio.de

Dr. Christoph Maria Ravesloot, Professor Innovation Sustainable Design and Construction Process at Rotterdam University of Applied Science published an article in European Coatings Journal 3/2012 (p. 8-10), which shows that the benefits of renovating the tunnel tubes in Rotterdam with photo catalytic technology are positive compared to the costs of the renovation.

New lead: Bad air quality forced the City of Rotterdam into innovation. Photocatalytic coatings in the Maastunnel can help remove part of the NOx and PM2.5 pollution from cars. According to a design study the innovation is technically and economically feasible. Pay back within few years. NO2 levels are measured around 40-80 NO2 [µg/m3] whereas PM levels are within 40-60 PM10 [µg/m3]. The two worst spots in Rotterdam are the North and South exits of the Maastunnel. Connecting the South and North borders of the riverside. The Maastunnel was first opened for traffic during World War two in 1943, when most of the city of Rotterdam still was recovering from heavy bombardments in 1940. Since then the Tunnel is still functioning as originally designed for. Because the Maastunnel nowadays is on the list of National Monuments, it has to be renovated and cleaned to sustain functionality for the future.

The Rotterdam Clean Air program initiated a feasibility design study for the Maastunnel, executed during 2011. The feasibility study should analyse the technical feasibility and costs and benefits of the potential use of catalytic nano TiO2 paint.

Click here to get all information in the latest European Coatings Journal

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