Please wait.'

Page is loading'


Friday, 06 December 2019
Events, European Coatings Fire Forum 2019, Schedule

Abstracts

abstracts_©Lansera - Fotolia
 
"

Short course

Flame retardant coatings: basics and new developments

Dr. Sabyasachi Gaan, Empa, Switzerland

This short course will focus on the fundamentals of the flame retardant coatings (i.e. their formulations and mode of action of active ingredients in the coatings) for application on various substrates like tex-tiles, films, foams, wood, tapes, composites, metals etc. Recent developments (last decade) in flame re-tardant coatings that mostly work by formation of conventional char (condensed phase) and or radical species in gas phase will be elaborated. Advancements in the method of application of such coatings on various substrates, new technological developments in terms of flame retardant chemistry and their formulation will also be summarized in this short course.

"
"

Obtaining data from reaction to fire tests

Dr. Davood Zeinali, University of Ghent, Belgium 

Classification of reaction to fire is mandatory for compliance with the building regulations. Consequently, many manufacturers carry out reaction to fire testing as part of their R&D  projects in order to characterize the basic fire properties of their products. In this view, a guide has been developed on how to obtain data from these tests, thanks to an international collaboration within the framework of COST Action FP1404. The practical aspects of the experimental procedures and requirements are presented, focusing primarily on the requirements of European standards such as EN 13501-1 but also ISO and ASTM test methods.

"
"

Organic phosphorus compounds as flame retardants for coatings 

Otto Mauerer, Lanxess, Germany

Organic phosphate esters have long been used as flame retardants and flame-retardant plasticizers in many polymeric materials. The clear, colorless additives of low viscosity are particularly well suited for use in liquid polymer systems such as thermosets or PUR formulations. Some of the classical phosphorus compounds, such as alkyl and aryl phosphates reach with respect to the ever increasing demands on modern additives their limits. Additives today should be halogen-free, show a low volatility and migration. In addition, the substances should have a favorable labeling. All this, of course, without sacrificing the flame retardancy. In order to meet these requirements, a number of new phosphorus compounds have been developed in recent years, initially intended for use in materials for the construction and automotive industries. But with the increasing demands on the fire protection of components or furnishing not only the materials or substrates but also coatings, adhesives and sealants have to make a contribution to fire resistance. The presentation shows the influence of organic phosphorus compounds on the properties of a transparent polyurethane varnish. Here are some well-known aryl phosphates compared with newly developed phosphorus compounds. Some typical optical and mechanical coating properties as well as the behavior of the coatings towards light and chemicals were investigated. The main focus was on the fire behavior of the coatings, which was examined with a Cone Calorimeter. The results show that a moderate improvement of the flame retardance with liquid phosphorus compounds is possible, whereby the required coating properties are almost completely retained.

"
"

Preparation of phosphorus-nitrogen-carbon integrated flame retardant and its application in amino transparent fireproof coating

Xuelin Liu, Insa Rouen, France

Transparent fire resistant coatings can not only maintain the original appearance but also play an important role of fire protection and decoration. In the past thirty years, intumescent flame retardant coating gained extensive attention in both research area and industrial application for its excellent fire resistant efficiency. Transparent intumescent fire resistive coatings were usually prepared by blending phosphate esters with amino resin, however, phosphate esters were often made up of low molecule polyols, which cannot form thick carbon layers, thus, having the fire resistant time less than 900 s. Bisphenol A epoxy resin has abundant carbon source and the benzene ring in the molecular chain might improve the thermal stability and could promote the formation of thicker char. In this work, two phosphorus-nitrogen-carbon integrated flame retardants were prepared by using bisphenol A epoxy resin as charring agent and the transparent coatings were prepared by blending the flame retardants with amino resin. The fire resistant time, smoke suppression and heat release rate of coatings were investigated, fortunately, thicker char was formed and long fire resistant time of 3360 s was obtained.

"
"

Fire retardant coating from biomaterials

Vesa Kunnari, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Finland

This talk introduces HefCel technology (High-Consistency Enzymatic Fibrillation of Cellulose). The patented technology achieves high solid, moisture breathable coatings with excellent fire retardancy over different types of wood. A spray- or brush-applied fire retardant coating made from mixture of nanocellulose and inorganic nano-scale pigment is well suited for improving the fire properties of wood-based materials. It reduces the access of oxygen to the surface, thus significantly inhibiting combustion.

"
"

Reaction to fire: When you are trying to win a sprint not a marathon

Dr. Jens Ravnsbæk, Teknos, Denmark

In a time where sustainability and fire safety are very high on the agenda, it is of vital importance that new solutions are developed to support the market needs. Many construction materials are made from combustible materials and will have to pass fire testing in accordance with "reaction to fire” methods to meet the requirements in the construction product regulation (CPR). Reaction to fire (EN13501-1) is significantly different from Fire resistance testing (EN13501-2) and requires different considerations in relation to the passive fire protection system. In this presentation I will go through some of the methods and tools utilized in the development of new fire-retardant coatings.

"
"

Welcome to fire retardant binders for coatings - salt-free, halogen-free, solvent-free

Rule Niederstadt, Ecoatech, Germany 

The presentation will introduce an entirely new technology which allows intumescent FR coating for different applications. Almost every binder system is burnable which cannot be compensated by addition of FR additives. It is more efficient to modify the binder system itself rather than introducing new additives. TECHNOPHOS polymers contain high concentration of phosphor and nitrogen in the polymer chain and build a  binder system which is very effective against fire and smoke. Salt-free, halogen-free, solvent-free, this technology provides opportunities to innovative companies.

"
"

Invisible fire protection for timber in construction

Prof. Richard T Hull, University of Central Lancashire, United Kingdom

The urgent need to respond to the climate crisis, and switch to sustainable materials within a circular economy, has significantly enhanced the popularity of wood as a construction product. Its appearance communicates the "green” credentials of a building. However, small fires have resulted in rapid fire spread across timber façades, often engulfing whole blocks of apartments. Biocidal and thermal treatments, which are effective in preventing microbial decay, allow wood to be used on taller buildings without the problems of frequent repainting. Many existing fire retardant treatments lack durability and have been shown to be ineffective after a few years exposure to weather. Building regulations do not generally assess the durability of fire protective treatments. In order to meet the combined goals of sustainability and fire safety, there is an urgent need to develop novel, durable, fire retardant treatments for timber which do not obscure its natural appearance. The talk will focus on penetrative treatments and reduced-scale methodologies for assessing their potential for development.

"
"

Degradation of water-based intumescent coatings

Lars-Hendrik Daus, Federal Institute for Material Research and Testing (BAM), Germany

Bare steel constructions are often integrated in modern buildings. Intumescent coatings are widely used to protect the steel from heating up too quickly in a case of fire. As the functionality of intumescent coatings decreases with the impact of weathering processes, it is important to understand the mechanisms of material degradation to maintain long durability. The weathering-induced degradation behavior of a water-borne intumescent coating was examined, and the weakest points of the formulation were identified by a systematic approach. Resulting from this investigation, adjustments to the formula were made, leading to improved weathering resistance.

"
"

Case study: controlling fire in modern, well insulated houses in the Netherlands

Krijn Leenderste, Allshield, The Netherlands

"
"

Flame retardant self-stratifying coating

Prof. Sophie Duquesne, University of Lille, France

Lowering fire hazard posed by combustible materials such as plastics may be achieved by the use of suitable flame retardant treatments, like protective coatings. However, exposure to long‐term environmental conditions can cause loss of their functional properties, thus reducing their effectiveness over time. This is why two or three different layers with specific properties (e.g. adhesive, fire retardant and hydrophobic) are generally needed to provide durable fire retardancy to polymer through it surface. However, these multilayered systems usually require complex applications and curing procedures which are sometimes incompatible with industrial constraints. Thus, the effective and economical concept of self‐stratifying coatings has been developed to produce multilayered paint films from a single coat without compromising the advantages of the actual treatment. This approach has recently demonstrated a great interest for fire retardant (FR) purpose and will be fully discussed in the presentation.

"
"

New generation charring promoters in water-based intumescent coatings

 Dr. Sebastian Moschel, Chemische Fabrik Budenheim, Germany

Effective fire protection systems for steel must be easily applicable and long lasting, even under extreme outdoor exposures. Innovations in charring promoters with special treatments result in intumescent coatings with stable viscosity and excellent resistance to weather and fire.

"
"

Flame retardants for wood-coatings

Dr. Albert Jeyakuar, ICL-IP Flame Retardants, The Netherlands

Being a world’s leading Flame-Retardant (FR) producer, ICL-IP offers a wide range of Fire Safety solutions for various end applications across the globe, for multiple applications, such as Building & Construction, Electronics and Electricity, Textiles, Adhesives, Coatings and others. ICL-IP developed a new generation of polymeric, sustainable (Oeko-Tex® approved) flame retardants. TexFRon® 4002 & LaqFRon™ are two of such new FRs designed for water-based clear wood lacquers.  ICL-IP offers also sustainable FR solutions for epoxy-based coating and solvent based systems, such as Phosflex® and Fyrol® product lines.   The presentation provides an overview of flame retardants for wood coatings with key properties of coatings like appearance and assess for flammability data, showing improvement in flame spread and heat release.

"
top of page

Contact

Moritz Schürmeyer
Moritz Schürmeyer
Event Manager
Vincentz Network
Tel.: +49 511 99 10-278
Fax: +49 511 99 10-279

Programme

Programme
Programme
(pdf 616 kB)

Sponsorship Opportunities

Sponsorship Opportunities
Sponsorship Opportunities
(pdf 354 kB)