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Sunday, 21 July 2019
Events, EC Technology Forum | Biocides - preservation in challenging times, Conference Programme

Abstracts

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Short Course: Biocides and their alternatives - which way will we go?

Constanze Messal, Micor, Germany

Biocides still play an important role in material protection, in disinfection of surfaces or in medical applications. Many products cannot exist unprotected until in use or over their lifespan. Their deterioration by microorganisms is not only the limitation of use, it costs. Money, time and reputation. For other sensible products the production without any microbial contamination is important. Therefore, threated machines or packaging materials are needed. Biocides are used in many aspects of life: Food, water, air, materials, cosmetics, lubricants, fuel… And often similar substances for different matters. Biocides prevent microbial growth, but their efficacy also can be a problem for users. Unexpected toxic reactions with other substances, non-target effects or higher sensibility rates… The rate of so-called multiple chemical sensitization related persons is increasing. Also the sensitization of people to isothiazolones biocides and parabens. And we know today, that those multilateral sensitizations are caused by lower dosed long-term contact with cosmetics e.g. But the allergic reaction comes later in contact with protected materials. You see, al lot of homebuilt problems. No wondering about more regulation by the EU… This is not an easy time to develop helpful biocidal products. That yields also to a smaller board of usable active substances. However, more and more biocide free products enter the market. Not only as a result of the public meaning: people want less chemicals at their private and professional environment. It must be seen as an answer of producers themselves, we need sustainable products reaction in respect of health and environmental aspects, less usable substances and limited resources. In the end it is still an interaction between cells, substances and surfaces. From times, when biocidal treatments were the gold standard and used as much as possible to times of a sustainable use – it is still a challenge. It starts with a more detailed knowledge of effectiveness of biocides up to a deeper comprehension of microbial strategies to avoid harmful biocide contact and at least we develop strategies in material design to disclaim biocidal treatment. Biocides and their alternatives: a look around those interactions and problems may open the mind to choose a careful way.

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Talk 1: Preservation of paints and coatings - current regulatory developments and challenges

Philipp Seidenstücker, Lanxess, Germany

Biocides protect products from decomposition, save raw materials and reduce waste. Over the past years, new regulatory constraints have put increasing  pressure on biocidal active ingredients for the Paints & Coatings industry. As a result, the amount of available active ingredients to preserve water-based coatings has dramatically decreased leaving only few active ingredients for in-can and dry-film preservation.

Therefore, these active ingredients have to be defended in order to keep harm away from the end user. The impression, that paints could also be preserved without biocides will lead to an increased amount of contaminated paints, contaminated facilities and most dramatically, have an influence on human health. Biocide-free paints can be subject to microbial attack in the long run. Therefore preservatives continue to be inevitable in order to secure the product properties.

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Workshop 1: Industrial preservation in challenging times

Alistair Sharp, Lonza, Switzerland

Whilst biocidal product legislation in Europe has been in place for nearly two decades, it is now that water-based industrial applications are significantly affected.  The practical removal of methylisothiazolinone (MIT) from the European market is causing major market disruptions.  Many in the industry will need to replace existing preservation systems, which is a resource-intensive task considering the difficult current and future regulatory framework. The workshop looks to examine novel solutions under the current European biocidal regulatory landscape for in-can and film preservative biocides. Recent changes effect products available to the industry and remaining alternatives available for preservation will be reviewed.”

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Workshop 2: Biocide free binders

Christof Arz, Vanora, Switzerland

With the current trend of intensifying regulations in biocies it will be nearly impossible to have label free polymers with good protection against bacteria or funghi attacks. New ways of protection need to be evaluated. One potential route are silicates containing polymers. High pH values guarantee protection and the polymer can be used in various applications. This workshop discusses where to use the new binders and what  their properties and limits are. Are there alternatives?

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Workshop 3: New durable technology development to protect substrates against microbes

Barend van der Velde, Croda, The Netherlands

In modern society the protection against microbes is highly important. The disadvantage of current technology is that the activity will decrease in time, leaving the surface unprotected after the active has leached out. Furthermore such leaching has an impact on exposure through its toxicity and environmental safety. Croda has developed a technology that overcomes the challenges with current known systems, preventing development of microbial resistance. The technology uses a tethered function that prevents microbial growth without releasing this active into the environment. The unique incorporation into the technology provides protection of the coated substrate against micro-organisms. The inclusion of the novel technology does not compromise the paint and coating properties.

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Workshop 4: In-can preservation - a microbiologist’s contribution to a difficult task

Jan Lorenzen, Danish Technological Institute, Denmark

As in-can preservation of paint is becoming increasingly challenging, it becomes more important to identify the root causes of rotting paint. This work shop will illustrate how e.g. traceability and microbial identification can contribute to identify vulnerable products, raw materials, processes and procedures and locate sources of microbial contamination. Understanding the problem helps to achieve the best preservation in the given circumstances.

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Talk 2: The biotechnology of coatings - eliminating, reducing, and enhancing biocides

Steve McDaniel, Reactive Surfaces, United States of America

The ability of modern biotechnology to detect, identify, quantitate, and mitigate microbial contaminants of coatings greatly expands the opportunity to design novel approaches for paint preservation and paint surface protection. For instance, by isolating DNA and RNA from coatings and their formulation components, it is possible to not only detect contamination at very early stages using molecular probes, but also to quickly identify the specific contaminants using nucleic acid sequencing and sequence comparison to microbial DNA databases. This allows for early identification and quantitation before the populations within the coating or raw material cause damaging spoilage enabling the formulator to "surgically” kill the culprit using bio-based biocides designed specifically for that microbial strain. In addition to the ability to control contamination in-process with precision, bio-based biocides can be used in place of (or in combination with) traditional biocides in order to dramatically reduce the concentrations of in-can toxic biocides. In some cases, synergistic killing is observed when bio-based biocides are used as preservatives. If in-film biocidal activity is desired, bio-based biocides provide excellent surface protection against microbial agents of coating deterioration and have the ability to eliminate pathogenic microbes. Such in-film surfaces can additionally be designed to rid themselves of contaminating nucleic acids thereby preventing transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes. These functional surfaces  could also be used to control in-can contamination, especially that arising from biofilms at interfaces known to be more conducive to growth, such as liner surfaces, lid surfaces, and surfaces surrounding container head spaces. By applying the powerful techniques of modern molecular biology to coatings, it is possible to design protection approaches using novel bio-based biocides that allow the manufacture and application of less expensive , less toxic, and more hygienic coatings.

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Workshop 5: Luminultra and Tennants – Microbial Monitoring

Jasper Stegemans, Tennants, The Netherlands

Luminultra’s second generations ATP (ATP2G) is THE answer to the forthcoming new biocide regulations. In short; new biocide regulations are pushing producers to use less biocides at lower dosages. These new regulations can only be answered by clean house-keeping using Luminultra’s ATP2G. ATP2G is a superior microbial control tool that provides users with instant quantitative results. We see that there’s  an exponentially increasing demand for our system together with the choice of the right biocides. In Europe we serve 100+ customers in surface coatings applications including slurries, adhesives, paints, lubricants, coolants and metalworking fluids. With ATP2G, users can ACT instead of RE-ACT to microbial contaminations or microbial upsets which is essential.

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Workshop 6: Innovations in system cleaning and plant hygiene

David Zilm, Vink Chemicals, Germany

Increasing demand in plant hygiene and the wish for optimised biocides lead to the deelopment of "Ecoline Pipe Purifacation". Together with system cleaners like Vokocide SR1 and Vinkocide SR3 it is possible to eliminate all biofilms in and build-up of material in pipes in production and filling areas of paint and coatings.

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Workshop 7: New MIT-regulation – impact on new binder development and implementation in production

Thomas Bernhofer, Synthomer, Germany

New binder development (See also ECJ 11-2018) triggered by 13. ATP-decision (Adaption of SCL for MIT). Implementation in production in several steps: a. testing of efficacy of new biocide packages in challenge tests b. after determination of new packages roll-out site by site c. follow-up by analysis of residual biocides and ATP-test

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Workshop 8: Advances in mircrobial detection

Alexander Böhler, CellFacts Analytics, Germany

CellFacts is a highly automated, real-time microbial detection method for paints, resins and slurries. Measuring the microbial load, as well as the size and metabolic activity of individual cells, it helps to differentiate between active and dormant cells as a basis for  more accurate disinfection and preservation. The CellFacts laboratory system can be enhanced by early-warning sensors installed at tanks and pipes, to serve as a 24/7-microbiological surveillance system, covering the entire paint production process.

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Talk 3: Undesired green - algae and fungi on facades

Christof Walter, VdL, Germany

Within the framework of the circular economy and sustainability goals, it is desired that the service live of façade paints should be as long as possible. This encompasses that the façade retains its desired appearance. However, microbial infestation by fungi and algea can be interfering with this goal. One possible remedy is the use of dry-film preservatives. However, in the course of the systematic re-evaluation of all biocidal active substances it is expected that the number of allowed actives for PT7 will dramatically reduce, which leads to ecological and economic consequences. In this talk the different possibilities to prevent growth of algea and fungi will be discussed, with a focus on the regulatory situation of the film preservatives.

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Talk 4: Preventing permanent barnacle adhesion using microstructures and material related effects

Dennis Petersen, Kiel University (CAU), Germany

The ocean is considered as the seventh largest economy in the world and is one of the largest providers of food. However, the unsustainable usage of marine resources and ocean pollution is a major threat to future human health and wealth. A main contributor to ocean pollution is the prevention of sessile marine organisms to foul on ship hulls, off-shore wind turbines, buoys, and maritime installations in general. Conventionally, maritime surfaces are protected using antifouling coatings that constantly emit toxins into the marine environment, which not only threatens marine ecosystems but also reach us humans via the food chain. We developed a novel coating based on an advantageous combination of a non-sticky, silicone-based material with a re-entrant, non-wettable surface topography as an alternative emission-free strategy to prevent permanent marine biofouling. In a long-term field test in the marine environment our coating showed superior fouling release properties in comparison to other conventional non-toxic coatings. Based on physical principles only, the superrepellent re-entrant surface topography prevents the complete wetting of the solidifying glues used by sessile marine organisms and thus the formation of a robust and reliable adhesive joint. At a critical size of these organisms or induced by smallest drag forces they simply detach from the coating without any environmental impact.

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Talk 5: A Functional Enzyme Mimics for Oxidative Halogenation Reactions to Combat Biofilm Formation

Wolfgang Tremel, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Germany

A variety of transition metal oxide nanoparticles can serve as functional mimics of halogenating enzymes. These enzymes are involved in halometabolite biosynthesis.[1] Their activity is based on the formation of hypohalous acids from halides and hydrogen peroxide or oxygen which form in follow-up reactions bioactive secondary metabolites of microbial origin with strong antibacterial and antifungal activities. Therefore, enzyme mimics and halogenating enzymes may be valuable tools to combat biofilm formation. We describe halogenating enzyme models, and showcase enzyme mimics with the highest potential based on V2O5 [2] and defect-engineered CeO2 nanoparticles,[3] which are fabricated in large amounts using a continuous flow technique. They may find application in antifouling coatings,[4] indoor and outdoor paints, polymer membranes for water desalination, or in aquacultures. Further studies have shown that they are active on surfaces for food packaging, door handles, hand rails, push buttons, keyboards, and other elements made of plastic where biofilms are present, and they can combat even multidrug resistant bacteria.
Employing nanoparticle haloperoxidase mimics is a biomimicry approach for substituting conventional biocides or costly enzymatic preservation systems by cheap and stable "heterogeneous catalysts”. Haloperoxidase mimics allow designing stable antibacterial materials with high chemical stability, low environmental toxicity due to the insolubility of many oxides and ceria in water, low costs, constant availability of the substrates (H2O2 and halide) which are required for a dynamic antibacterial activity (HOX formation), and intrinsic activity at substrate concentrations comparable to those encountered in aqueous environments.

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Talk 6: In-can preservation without biocides?

Helmut Möbus, DAW, Germany

In-can preservatives for waterborne paints and varnishes are under legal and public pressure. Though industry and associations have shown the necessity of a minimum diversity of in-can preservatives and vote for a holistic approach to that difficile matter the active substances become more and more restricted. Lately, classification of methylisothiazolinone has been scrutinized to a SCL much below any effective concentration causing aggravated labelling of building products. Producers of waterborne paints, plasters and varnishes have been looking for alternatives for some years. "What possibilities do exist to produce storage stable waterborne building products with a minimum or even without biocides” and "what are the chances to realize them” are main questions to be answered in that lecture.

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Contact

Bettina Hoffmann
Bettina Hoffmann
Senior Event Manager
Vincentz Network
+49 511 99 10 271
+49 511 99 10 279

Conference programme

Conference programme
Conference programme
(pdf 671 kB)