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Wednesday, 16 October 2019
Events, EC Technology Forum | Bio-based Coatings, Conference Programme

Abstracts

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Short course: Materials in circular bio-economy: a holistic view on bio-based materials

Jussi Lahtinen, VTT, Finland

An introductory course to the world of bio-based materials. Evaluation of the benefits and difficulties that the transformation from linear economy to circular bio-economy brings, including a review of definitions and terminology used. Looking into different raw materials from agricultural waste to different industry side streams. Evaluating sustainability of petroleum based materials against bio-based alternatives. Discussing importance of end-of-life thinking and design for recycling regarding bio-based materials, with a special focus on packaging materials. Outlook of recent developments and future possibilities of utilising bio-based materials in various end-uses with research and industry examples.

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Keynote: Bio-based economy – a case study of a multi-national chemical company

Sjaak Griffioen, DSM, The Netherlands

The first part of the story will elaborate on the "why” we need to transform to a more circular and biobased approach for our industry. Driven by the Paris agreement and the SDG’s we have several options to mitigate our carbon footprint in which choosing for biobased building blocks is a necessary and integral part of this transformation. As DSM we have announced that by 2030, 30% of our raw materials will be from a biobased or recycled origin, all driven to reduce our scope 3 carbon footprint intensity drastically. The second part of the story will focus on "how” part and will highlight the trends, the emerging capabilities as well as the desire -and need- for creating partnerships in the value chain making sure we, as industry, are able to minimize our footprint in the most economical way.

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Workshop 1: From vegetable oils to bio-based binders: basic components, modifications and examples 

Dr Michael Blumenstein & Elisabeth Moshake, Hobum Oleochemicals, Germany

With an increasing demand of bio-based coatings the question of which raw materials can be used gains importance. Renewable sources like vegetable oils come into play. But which characteristics do vegetable oils have and how do their properties influence an application in coatings? Which one is the right one? Through modification of fatty acids from vegetable oil we at HOBUM Oleochemicals produce bio-based binders since 60 years. Together with you, we want to answer these questions and share examples from our daily work.

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Workshop 2: Raw materials and resins for coatings - today and tomorrow

Dr Toine Biemans, Worlée-Chemie, Germany

Tree resins like copal and rosin or shellac are natural based and renewable resins that were used for coatings, e.g. violins or furniture. With increasing demands on the performance of such coatings and the rise of the chemical coatings industry due to the availability of petrochemical products, such resins where replaced by man-made alternatives. The realisation that the current source of these petrochemical products is finite is forcing the chemical industry to look again to Nature for alternatives. Biological polymers like lignin, cellulose, starch but also proteins and chitin are being investigated for their properties. But they are also broken down into chemical building blocks that are either used directly or converted into new monomeric components. In this talk I will present some promising renewable raw materials and how they can be used in resins for coatings. Their pitfalls and their benefits will be discussed as well as their replacement potential. Also some examples of resins and coatings based on these raw materials will be presented and compared to petrochemical alternatives. Furthermore an outlook will be given for other sources of raw materials and potential directions of future research. A special case will be made for sustainability to which we have contributed through our price-winning sustainability project.

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Workshop 3:  Bio-based coatings within the circular economy

Gerard Zoller, Peintures Robin, Luxembourg

Cyclic economy gives business models and marketing aspects a new twist in case of bio-based paints. Was does C2C mean in case of paints, which technical and economical requierments are necessary for the C2C lable? What is cyclic economy in the paint industry?

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Workshop 4: What a tree can do – changing the future of coatings with a bio-based renewable solution

Amit Trivedi, Stora Enso, Sweden

The workshop will look at renewable cellulose-based additives for rheological, strength and barrier properties in coating formulations. They are highly flexible and have wide compatibility in formulating water-based recipes. A discussion over case studies of this sustainable and traceable raw material is very welcome.

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Talk 1: Biobased, biodegradable or sustainable solutions?

Dr Gun Lundsten, CH-Polymers, Finland

Which one are you most interested in? As a waterborne polymer dispersion producer for both paper and packaging, paints and coating as for non-woven and textile applications we are trying to find solutions for all these needs. But biobased doesn’t necessarily mean that the solution is biodegradable! And sustainable solutions doesn’t necessarily need to be biobased. In this talk we will philosophise around these concepts and present some of our biobased, biodegradable and sustainable solutions!

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Workshop 5: Microfibrillated cellulose and its effects on paint stability and application performance

Dr Harrison Gallantree-Smith, Borregard, Norway

Recently, there has a been a shift in the coatings industry to move towards water-based rather than solvent-based systems. This is due to the elevated environmental and occupational health issues associated with solvent-based systems. However, the movement towards water-based systems has not been simple and many issues have arisen within the industry. The stability of pigments and paints has been one issue in water-based systems, very often syneresis and settling has occurred. Other issues center on the poor performance of water-based paints with sagging and levelling. The challenge today is to find a technology that manages to solve these issues as well as remaining a sustainable and 100% bio-based alternative. Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) is one of these technologies that is able to bridge the gap in performance between water-based and solvent-based systems and is 100% bio-based. Produced from Norwegian spruce, MFC is a value-added and multifunctional product made of cellulose, consisting of a network of fibrils with lateral dimensions in the nanoscale and lengths up to micron scale. The main characteristics of this unique fibril structure is the resemblance of both water soluble polymers and insoluble additives, leading to a versatile and efficient alternative to the technologies currently available. We will demonstrate how the strong network of fibrils not only allows a reduction in the syneresis within the formulations but also improves the anti-sagging properties by increasing the yield stress of the formulations. Surprisingly, MFC also improves the levelling of the same formulations, which displays how versatile and effective MFC can be as a coating additive.

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Workshop 6: How to make a renewable material compliant for an application?

Dr Klaus-Uwe Koch, University of Applied Sciences Recklinghausen, Germany

To use Poly Lactic Acid as a backbone polymer for a Hot Melt Pressure Sensitive Adhesive was an objective of a project. However, this raw material is not suitable without modifications due to its properties. It is shown how this raw material can be used for the desired purpose with only small structural changes. Beyond these variations, finding the right formulation is another important component in making the polymer applicable as a basic component of the adhesive.

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Workshop 7: Bio-based coatings and functionality - clash or match 

Dr Stefan Friebel, Fraunhofer Institute for Wood Research Wilhelm-Klauditz-Institut WKI, Germany

The use of bio-sourced coatings provides usually a better CO2-balance. However, bio-sourced products must also be economically viable and their performance comparable to petrochemical products. Coatings are currently expected to fulfill at least one other function in addition to their decorative properties. Although the variety of bio-sourced raw materials is significantly lower compared to petrochemicals, some bio-sourced building blocks have interesting functional properties that can be transferred to the binder and thus into the coating. For example, weather-resistant hydrophobic coatings can be produced with special fatty acid combinations. The raw materials used are e.g. by-products of vegetable oil production. The combination of sugar and vegetable oil derivatives allow the synthesis of extremely weather-stable UV-curing waterborne coatings. Additionally sugar-based UV coatings are presented for furniture applications. The essential resin component is moreover free of acrylates. Finally, bio-sourced, vegan imitation leather will be presented. Possible applications for this are the automotive sector, furniture industry, accessories, such as handbags or the clothing industry.

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Workshop 8: Additives based on renewable raw materials for environmentally friendly paints and varnishes

Jörg Wollschläger, Münzing, Germany

Increased regulatory requirements and growing environmental awareness are driving forces in the development of sustainable and environmentally friendly coatings. Especially in the field of additives, there are many challenges for the implementation of the set goals. For example, sustainable additives must not have a negative influence on the effectiveness of formulations. It has been shown that a smart selection of raw materials, for example in the case of defoamers, can even achieve significant improvements in performance compared with conventional defoamers based on mineral oils. The use of native oils such as rapeseed and castor oil in combination with oxalkylated compounds play an essential role. So far, such environmentally friendly products have been used primarily in decorative applications and architectural paints. However, sustainable additives are also becoming increasingly important in industrial coatings. In addition to defoamers, other additive groups can also be formulated based on renewable raw materials, such as wetting and dispersing agents, emulsifiers, open-time additives, hydrophobing agents and waxes.Possibilities for the use of sustainable additives in coatings are demonstrated and examples from laboratory projects and customer applications are discussed.

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Talk 2: Versatile monomer platform for plant oil-based latexes

Dr AndriyVoronov, North Dakota State University, United States

Synthesis of emulsion polymers from plant oil-based monomers might provide an opportunity to replace petroleum-based constituents in latex synthesis and reduce VOC content in resulting polymeric materials. Incorporation of plant oil-based fragments into the latex copolymers provides plasticization and hydrophobization, as well as improves toughness of the final crosslinked latex polymer films. This work reports on emulsion polymers with biobased content of at least 70 % wt. synthesized in miniemulsion from new vinyl monomers derived from a variety of plant oils using transesterification reaction.

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Talk 3: 2K Michael addition -  a promising chemistry for bio-based coatings

Dr Florian Lunzer, Allnex, Germany

Recently, 2K Michael addition-based coating systems have been introduced which provide fast drying at room temperature in combination with tunable open time and very long pot life.  Apart from the productivity gains which can be achieved with this system due to its fast curing speed the sustainability of the coating process is positively affected in many respects in comparison to the commonly used high performance topcoats based on isocyanate-cured polyols. Drying of the coated pieces can be performed at room temperature, eliminating the energy consumption of the forced drying step usually applied with conventional isocyanate cured polyols. Formulations usually contain below 250g/L VOC and are isocyanate and formaldehyde free. The possibilities to  increase the renewable raw material content of the described coating systems without compromising on performance will be outlined.

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Talk 4: VAE and the "green" side of architectural coatings

Dr Martin Schierhorn,Wacker, Germany

Renewables have been becoming more and more popular in recent years and this trend looks set to continue. The standard binder systems currently used in interior paints have not been readily available in renewable versions. By contrast, the renewable solutions available often have restricted performance and in many cases need to be reformulated. VAE technology has been used extensively in interior paints in Europe over the last decade. WACKER has done a lot of work to tailor VAE technology to renewables. At the European Coatings Technology Forum - Biobased Coatings, WACKER will present two different approaches to this issue, each with its own distinct benefits.

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Talk 5: Shellac, a versatile biopolymer for coatings

Manfred Penning, Shellac Consultant, Germany

Shellac, the only commercially used insect resin fits perfectly into the concept of GREEN Chemistry and renewable biodegradable natural resins and binders for coatings. Shellac is an excellent filmformer and has a very good adhesion on many surfaces.High gloss, a good surface hardness and an excellent UV resistance are important properties of this natural polymer. Shellac films are also resistant against hydrocarbons..A very low water vapour and oxygen permeability as well as a good compatibility with other polymers and additives make shellac an interesting binder and coating resin. It can be applied from organic solvents or aqueous alkaline solutions. It is a foodgrade polymer ( E 904 in Europe) and approved for the coating of children’s toys. By utililizing the reactive groups of Shellac combinations with other natural or synthetic polymers are possible. Also these groups can be used for crosslinking Shellac or by an esterification to modify filmproperties.

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Contact

Kristina Wilger
Kristina Wilger
Event Manager
Vincentz Network
T +49 511 9910-273
F +49 511 9910-279